Latisse Treatment


Now Available at San Antonio Eye Specialists

Imagine waking up with fuller, longer and darker eyelashes.

Imagine never again spending time applying and removing heavy coats of eye makeup or eyelash extensions.

Imagine total freedom from mascara.

Now you can with Latisse

While other eyelash extender products exist on the market, Latisse is the only eyelash treatment approved by the FDA for growing fuller, longer, darker eyelashes.

Latisse is derived from the drug Lumigan, used in the treatment of glaucoma. When effectively used, doctors found it to have an added effect: It grew patients’ eyelashes longer. The drug’s active ingredient, bimatoprost, increases the eyelash growth phase and the duration of the growth pattern, acting as an eyelash growth stimulator.

In 2008, the FDA approved Latisse for the treatment of “hypotrichosis,” the condition of sparse, or short, eyelashes. When Latisse is used daily, gradual results begin at 4 weeks, with full growth occurring at 16 weeks.

  • What is Latisse? Latisse is an FDA-approved treatment to improve eyelash health, thickness and integrity.
  • How does it work? The hair on your body grows in cycles, including your eyelashes. Latisse increases the growth phase of eyelashes.
  • How do I use Latisse? It is supplied in a kit that includes single-use-per-eye disposable applicators. Drops are applied to the base of the upper eyelashes, similar to using eyeliner.
  • What if I stop using Latisse? After several weeks to months, eyelashes typically return to their original appearance.
  • What are the possible side effects of Latisse? Eye itching or redness.
  • Do I need a prescription? Yes, call Dr. Iskander and ask our office staff for more information. Find out if you are a candidate for Latisse and begin your routine to growing fuller, longer lashes today.

For more information about Latisse please call San Antonio Eye Specialists at
(210) 822-9800 or you may also visit www.Latisse.com.

Contraindications: Glaucoma patients are advised to consult with their physician and be monitored for intraocular pressure (IOP) changes. Studies have shown concomitant use of Latisse may interfere with the IOP reduction.